Integrated aquaculture is the centrepiece of any waste transformation farm (WTF).

Not only is it an excellent example of the WTF principle of making use of the waste products of one organism as the feedstock of others, but it’s also the fastest way to put homegrown food on your table.  You can plant the seedlings of Asian and salad greens today and sit down to your first homegrown food about eighteen days later.  

The first time you eat fish and salad – grown by your own hand – is a great day.

But, even barramundi and a Greek salad, gets monotonous once you’ve had it a couple of dozen times.

People often refer to aquaponics as being an eco-system. For as much as that’s true, it’s a very skinny and unstable eco-system.  The ‘fish and salad’ approach to integrated aquaculture (iAVs or aquaponics) is not only dull from a culinary perspective – but it’s also limited in terms of its waste transformation potential.

Aquaponics generates wastes other than fish poop and metabolic ammonia. There are all of the plant residues that result from those vegetables we eat. Sometimes, we grow more fruit and vegetables than we can eat.

But it doesn’t end there.

Periodically, fate takes a wrong turn and you end up with a tank full of dead fish.   Even when the gods are with you, you’ll end up with a bucketful of heads, guts and scales after a couple of hours of cleaning your fish harvest.  I almost cry every time I hear somebody say that they buried their dead fish – or the processing residues from their fish.

The very least that should happen to a dead fish is that it should be made into fish hydrolosate – a potent organic fertiliser that can also be used as a high protein feed additive.

Fish mortalities – and the processing wastes from fish – are very high in protein. Fish (in any one of several forms) – and plants  – are 2/3 of a chicken’s diet. 

Once you integrate chickens into the food production system, your menu is looking so much more interesting for the eggs and meat that they will provide…and they cost you far less than normal because you’re getting most of their food from things that would be discarded or (at best) be thrown onto the compost heap.

And chickens are just the tip of the waste transformation iceberg – where even your plate scrapings have value.

If waste transformation farming interests you, and you’d like to talk about it with other like-minded people, feel free to take up membership of my Have More For Less forum.

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